James Clifford books in order – New List 06/2024

James Clifford is an American author known for his work in the field of cultural anthropology and postmodernism. He has written several influential books on the theme of cultural hybridity and the complex interplay of tradition and modernity.

James Clifford Books in Order

  1. Writing Culture: The Poetics and Politics of Ethnography
  2. The Predicament of Culture: Twentieth-Century Ethnography, Literature, and Art
  3. Routes: Travel and Translation in the Late Twentieth Century
  4. Returns: Becoming Indigenous in the Twenty-First Century
  5. On the Edges of Anthropology: Interviews
  6. Person and Myth: Maurice Leenhardt in the Melanesian World
  7. I frutti puri impazziscono. Etnografia, letteratura e arte nel secolo XX
  8. Formal Semantics and Pragmatics for Natural Language Querying (Cambridge Tracts in Theoretical Computer Science, Series Number 8)
  9. Itinerarios transculturales
  10. New Directions for Database Systems (Computer Based Systems for Information Management Series, Vol. 2)

Synopsis of James Clifford Books in Order

Writing Culture: The Poetics and Politics of Ethnography

“Writing Culture” by James Clifford is a seminal work in the field of anthropology, exploring the complex relationship between ethnography, culture, and writing. The book delves into the poetics and politics of ethnographic writing, examining the ways in which anthropologists represent and interpret cultures through their writings. Clifford challenges traditional notions of ethnography as a neutral, objective representation of culture, arguing instead that it is deeply embedded in power dynamics and influenced by the perspectives of the writer.

The book critically examines the role of the anthropologist as a mediator between cultures, raising questions about authority, representation, and ethics in ethnographic writing. Clifford emphasizes the importance of reflexivity and self-awareness in the writing process, calling for a more transparent and self-critical approach to ethnography. He also highlights the need for anthropologists to engage with the complex politics and ethical considerations of representing other cultures, acknowledging the power imbalances and potential for cultural misrepresentation inherent in the process.

“Writing Culture” is a thought-provoking and influential work that has had a significant impact on the field of anthropology. It has sparked important conversations about the nature of ethnographic writing, cultural representation, and the responsibilities of anthropologists. By challenging conventional ideas and calling for a more self-aware, reflexive approach to ethnography, Clifford’s book continues to shape the way anthropologists think about and practice their craft.

The Predicament of Culture: Twentieth-Century Ethnography, Literature, and Art

“The Predicament of Culture” by James Clifford is a seminal work that examines the intersection of ethnography, literature, and art in the 20th century. Clifford argues that cultural anthropology, literature, and art are not disparate fields, but are instead deeply interconnected in their representations of human experience. He explores the ways in which ethnography, literature, and art have influenced each other, and how they have shaped our understanding of different cultures.

The book also delves into the complexities and challenges of representing and interpreting culture. Clifford raises important questions about the power dynamics inherent in the act of studying and representing other cultures, and the ethical considerations that come into play. By examining the works of various writers, artists, and anthropologists, Clifford offers a critical analysis of the ways in which culture has been constructed, represented, and understood in the 20th century.

Overall, “The Predicament of Culture” is a thought-provoking and insightful exploration of the relationship between ethnography, literature, and art. Clifford’s interdisciplinary approach sheds light on the ways in which these fields intersect and inform each other, and raises important questions about representation, power, and ethics in cultural interpretation.

Routes: Travel and Translation in the Late Twentieth Century

“Routes: Travel and Translation in the Late Twentieth Century” by James Clifford explores the intersections of travel and translation in the late 20th century. The book delves into the ways in which travelers and migrants navigate between different cultural and linguistic spaces, and the resulting impact on the construction of individual and collective identities. Clifford also examines the role of translation in mediating encounters between diverse communities and the challenges of conveying the complexities of cultural meanings and experiences.

In “Routes,” Clifford offers a thought-provoking analysis of how travel and translation have shaped and transformed human experiences in an era of globalization. He highlights the complexities and ambiguities inherent in cross-cultural encounters, as well as the ways in which individuals and communities negotiate their sense of belonging and connection to diverse cultural landscapes. In doing so, Clifford offers a rich and nuanced understanding of the dynamic and fluid nature of cultural exchange and translation.

Overall, “Routes” offers a compelling exploration of the intricate connections between travel and translation, shedding light on the ways in which these processes have contributed to the formation of contemporary cultural identities and worldviews. Through his insightful analysis, Clifford invites readers to reflect on the complexities of human interactions and the ways in which travel and translation continue to shape our understanding of the world around us.

Returns: Becoming Indigenous in the Twenty-First Century

“Returns: Becoming Indigenous in the Twenty-First Century” by James Clifford explores the concept of indigeneity in the modern world. The book delves into the ways in which indigenous peoples are navigating the challenges and opportunities of the 21st century, particularly in the context of globalization and cultural exchange. Clifford examines how indigenous communities are reclaiming and revitalizing traditional practices, while also engaging with contemporary issues such as environmental conservation, human rights, and political sovereignty.

The book also examines the complexities of identity and belonging for indigenous peoples in the modern era. Clifford discusses how indigenous individuals and communities are negotiating their cultural heritage and traditions in a rapidly changing world, and how they are asserting their presence and agency in the face of ongoing colonial legacies. The author also highlights the ways in which indigenous knowledge and practices can offer valuable insights and perspectives for addressing contemporary global challenges.

Overall, “Returns: Becoming Indigenous in the Twenty-First Century” offers a nuanced and thought-provoking exploration of the complexities and possibilities of indigeneity in the modern world. Through rich ethnographic examples and theoretical analysis, Clifford provides a compelling study of how indigenous peoples are navigating the tensions between tradition and innovation, and the ways in which they are shaping their identities and futures in the 21st century.

On the Edges of Anthropology: Interviews

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Person and Myth: Maurice Leenhardt in the Melanesian World

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I frutti puri impazziscono. Etnografia, letteratura e arte nel secolo XX

“I frutti puri impazziscono. Etnografia, letteratura e arte nel secolo XX” by James Clifford explores the intersections of ethnography, literature, and art in the 20th century. The book delves into the ways in which these fields influence and inform one another, offering a comprehensive look at the relationships between them. Clifford draws on a wide range of examples from various cultures and time periods to illustrate his points, providing readers with a rich and diverse tapestry of connections between ethnography, literature, and art.

Clifford’s book also examines the ways in which the three fields have been intertwined historically, as well as the impact of colonialism, globalization, and other historical forces on their development. Through his analysis, Clifford offers new insights into the ways in which ethnography, literature, and art have evolved and interacted over time. He also explores the implications of these interactions for our understanding of culture, representation, and identity.

Overall, “I frutti puri impazziscono. Etnografia, letteratura e arte nel secolo XX” provides a compelling and thought-provoking exploration of the relationships between ethnography, literature, and art. Clifford’s interdisciplinary approach offers a fresh perspective on these interconnected fields, shedding new light on their shared history and future potential.

Formal Semantics and Pragmatics for Natural Language Querying (Cambridge Tracts in Theoretical Computer Science, Series Number 8)

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Itinerarios transculturales

“Itinerarios transculturales” by James Clifford explores the concept of transcultural itineraries, focusing on the interconnectedness of various cultures and the ways in which they shape individual and collective identities. Clifford argues that the movement of people, ideas, and objects across different cultural boundaries creates complex and dynamic processes of cultural exchange and transformation. Through a series of case studies and analyses, he examines the ways in which these transcultural itineraries are constructed, negotiated, and experienced in various historical and geographical contexts.

The book delves into the ways in which encounters with other cultures can lead to the formation of hybrid identities and new forms of cultural expression. Clifford also reflects on the power dynamics inherent in these transcultural interactions, highlighting the ways in which dominant cultures often assert their influence over marginalized cultures. Furthermore, he discusses the role of museums, archives, and other institutions in shaping and representing transcultural itineraries, shedding light on the politics of cultural display and representation.

Overall, “Itinerarios transculturales” offers a thought-provoking examination of the complexities and nuances of transcultural encounters, emphasizing the interconnectedness of diverse cultures and the ways in which they shape and transform each other. Clifford’s insightful analysis invites readers to reconsider their understanding of cultural boundaries and to appreciate the rich and dynamic nature of transcultural itineraries.

New Directions for Database Systems (Computer Based Systems for Information Management Series, Vol. 2)

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Biography James Clifford

James Clifford is a renowned historian and professor in the History of Consciousness Department at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Alongside Hayden White, he was one of the first faculty members appointed to the History of Consciousness Ph.D. program in 1978. This department, which was originally the sole graduate department at UC-Santa Cruz, remains a hub for innovative interdisciplinary and critical scholarship in the U.S. and abroad, largely due to the influence of Clifford and White, as well as other prominent faculty hired in the 1980s. Clifford also served as department chair from 2004 to 2007. He has authored several highly influential and widely translated books, including The Predicament of Culture: Twentieth Century Ethnography, Literature and Art (1988) and Routes: Travel and Translation in the Late 20th Century (1997), and served as editor of Writing Culture: the Poetics and Politics of Ethnography, with George Marcus (1986). Clifford’s work has sparked controversy and critical debate across disciplines such as literature, art history, visual studies, and cultural anthropology, particularly his literary critiques of written ethnography during the 1980s and early 1990s. While his dissertation research at Harvard University focused on anthropologist Maurice Leenhardt and Melanesia, Clifford is often mistakenly identified as an anthropologist, when in fact, his work in the field is typically critical and historical in nature and does not always involve fieldwork. His scholarship is heavily influenced by a geographical interest in Melanesia and encompasses a wide range of topics including indigeneity, globalization, museum studies, visual and performance studies, cultural studies, and translation, particularly in relation to the production of the indigenous category.

Author James Clifford

In conclusion, James Clifford’s body of work provides a comprehensive exploration of the ideological implications of travel, ethnography, and cultural representation. His books, from “The Predicament of Culture” to “Routes: Travel and Translation in the Late Twentieth Century,” offer valuable insights into the complexities of identity, power dynamics, and the construction of knowledge. By critically examining the intersections of culture, history, and ethnographic practice, Clifford’s work challenges us to reconsider our understanding of cultural difference, translation, and the ethics of representation in a globalized world.

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Published at 9:51 - 15/01/2024
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